Post Surgery Results For Weight Loss Patient - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Post Surgery Results For Weight Loss Patient

Posted:

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Hundreds of Middle Tennesseans have decided to go through weight loss surgery to help them shed their unwanted pounds especially since the medical surgery continues to improve.

In part two of our special Lap-Band surgery series we continue to follow our own NewsChannel5 employee Mitzi Gargus during post surgery to find out how she coped with her new lifestyle.

At 24-years-old, NewsChannel5 Plus director and producer, Mitzi Gargus knows about dieting.

"I've had some success at times. I'd lose maybe 15 pounds at a time, but it never lasts" said Gargus.

After working on a Medical Monday program about weight loss Gargus decided to make a lifestyle change.

"There's no cheating, it's not an option. You know, there's no reason to half way do it. If we're doing it, we're doing it," said Gargus.

In December of 2008 Gargus had Lap-Band surgery. A small device was placed around the upper portion of her stomach in order to restrict the amount of food she can eat.
One Patient's Weight Loss Surgery

Bariatric Surgeon Dr. Charles Morton performed the operation.

"If she'll be diligent, if she'll stay focused, you know we'd like to see a pound or two a week I think that first year," said Morton.

At her post-surgery follow-up in February she had lost 20 pounds. At the visit, she got an adjustment placing saline in a port hidden under the skin causing the lap-band is tightened.

"It's a little bizarre to feel the saline going in and you can feel it go into the band, and it's a little bizarre feeling but not bad," said Gargus.

The adjustments Gargus received restrict how much food she can have every day. Dr. Morton wants Gargus to have eight glasses of water everyday.

When Gargus first got the lap-band she could tolerate maybe a cup of food and now she is at a 1/2 cup to fill her up.

Along with the adjustment she must follow a healthy diet including proteins like beef, chicken, turkey and vegetables, fruits and protein shakes.
Lap-Band Surgery Diet, Rules For Success

She must also exercise 30 to 40 minutes three to four days a week. 

"Some days it's easy and I'm motivated and then some days I wake up and think I don't want to exercise today. I just want to go have an ice cream sundae," said Gargus.

Her dedication has helped her lose significant weight.

"I was in a 24 or 26 before and I'm in about an 18 now," said Gargus.

Everyday we took her picture and the weight was visibly melting off, not quite 5 months later a dramatic difference.

Gargus started at 280 pounds, Tuesday she weighed 210 pounds, a total weight loss of 70 pounds. 

"She's done everything right down the line, so I'm proud of her," said Morton.

Gargus's goal was to weigh in at 160 pounds.

"I can tell I'm a lot healthier and I feel a lot better. I still have a long way to go, but I'm feeling good," said Gargus.

The lap-band device is permanent but Gargus can have children if she wants. They just adjust the band during pregnancy.

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Friday, April 11 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-11 21:15:07 GMT
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a rare type of melanoma that targets the eye. It can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a type of melanoma that targets the eye. It affects about 2,000 people a year in the United States. Although rare – it can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
  • Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Thursday, April 10 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-10 21:15:09 GMT
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
  • Pedaling For A Cure

    Pedaling For A Cure

    Wednesday, April 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
  • Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Tuesday, April 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-08 21:15:13 GMT
    CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Eric Robinson alive after he went into cardiac arrest. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
    A year ago, while jamming with his son's band, Eric Robinson went into cardiac arrest. CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Robinson alive. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
  • Helping High Risk Hearts

    Helping High Risk Hearts

    Monday, April 7 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-07 21:15:09 GMT
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
  • Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Friday, April 4 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-04 21:15:07 GMT
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
  • Predicting Bad Hearts

    Predicting Bad Hearts

    Thursday, April 3 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-03 21:15:09 GMT
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner.more>>
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. And 600,000 die of heart disease. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner; and they did it by pure accident.more>>
  • Giving Shannon A Voice Of Her Own

    Giving Shannon A Voice Of Her Own

    Wednesday, April 2 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-02 21:15:05 GMT
    More than half a million children under age 15 has a severe communication disorder impairing their ability to speak or communicate with others. Now, advances in technology are giving them a voice—some for the first time.more>>
    More than half a million children under age 15 has a severe communication disorder impairing their ability to speak or communicate with others. Now, advances in technology are giving them a voice—some for the first time.more>>
  • Getting On Your Nerves To Save Your Heart

    Getting On Your Nerves To Save Your Heart

    Tuesday, April 1 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-01 21:15:06 GMT
    Heart failure is the fastest growing cardiovascular disorder in the U.S., affecting more than 6 million people. However, now a new device that gets on your nerves could help save those with heart failure.more>>
    Heart failure is the fastest growing cardiovascular disorder in the U.S., affecting more than 6 million people. It occurs when a person's heart is too weak to pump and circulate blood in the body. However, now a new device that gets on your nerves could help save those with heart failure.more>>
  • New Way To Hear For Grayson: Brain Stem Implant

    New Way To Hear For Grayson: Brain Stem Implant

    Monday, March 31 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-03-31 21:15:07 GMT
    Imagine being born profoundly deaf: missing the vital nerve needed for you to hear. Without it, you had no options; until now.more>>
    Imagine being born profoundly deaf: missing the vital nerve needed for you to hear. Without it, you had no options; until now.more>>
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.