Patients Turn To Acupuncture For Pain Treatment - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Patients Turn To Acupuncture For Pain Treatment

Posted:

CHICAGO - Chinese culture has turned to acupuncture for pain treatment for more than 5,000 years. Now, studies in the U.S. are trying to find out if this ancient medical art is more than just a legend.

More than 3 million adults and 150,000 kids turned to acupuncture for their ailments in 2008. Experts are hoping to find the science behind what one girl calls her "only source" of relief. 

"It's a constant, throbbing pain that never goes away," said Jessica Velez. "It's 24/7, everyday." 

A slew of ER trips, MRIs and spinal taps turned up bizarre results. Jessica was diagnosed with daily persistent headache syndrome - a mysterious chronic headache disorder. 

When medication failed, she turned to Rush University Medical Center acupuncturist Angela Johnson. 

"Acupuncture is not the 'magic bullet' for everybody, but it's certainly, certainly worth the try," said Johnson, a Chinese medicine practitioner. 

It's based on the idea that so-called pressure points control energy flow through the body. One study found acupuncture switches off the brain's response to pain - kind of like it's sleeping. Another study shows 70 percent of kids said acupuncture helped their symptoms. 

"Studies do show that there's absolutely a biochemical, physiological impact that acupuncture can have," said Johnson. "After she [Jessica] put only a few needles in, the pain almost went down to a five out of 10." 

Experts said using a licensed acupuncturist is important. You can find one at nccaom.org.   

Rush University Medical Center is still enrolling kids in the study to see if acupuncture improves their quality of life. Participants have to be between 5 and 20 years old and experiencing pain. 

RESEARCH SUMMARY:

CHILDREN SUFFERING FROM CHRONIC PAIN: New Daily Persistent Headache Syndrome (NDPH), is a condition where headaches occur for more than three full months. With these headaches, at least two of the following pain conditions occur: mild to moderate intensity, pulsating or pressure pains, vomiting, and nausea, according to Health Central. New daily persistent headaches may not be the most severe in pain but they are the most debilitating. Symptoms of NDPH are similar to those of migraines in that the patient becomes sensitive to light and sound as well as pain in one side or both sides of the head. Most patients suffering from NDPH have never experienced headaches or migraines before. The sudden onset can begin with infection in the body, stress, or surgery.  (SOURCE: About.com)

CURRENT PAIN TREATMENTS: Pain treatment for headaches truly depends on the person and the severity of his or her pain. Furthermore, the location is important as well so doctors know what kind of pain and where the pain is located for proper treatment. In addition, headaches cannot be cured, yet they can be controlled. Medication is one treatment. Certain medications can be prescribed for pain, nausea and vomiting. Other personal changes can be made as well as lifestyle changes like: relaxation treatment, stress management, and personal counseling. Occasionally, over the counter medications such as Advil and Ibuprofen will do the trick!

ACUPUCTURE: ANCIENT MEDICAL ART THAT IS HEALING KIDS: Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin needles into the body's skin at strategic pressure points on the body, according to the Mayo Clinic. This technique has been used for over 5,000 years and now is showing promise in healing young children who suffer from chronic pain.  Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital recently used MRI's to study the brain's response during acupuncture treatment. They found that the brain's response to pain turns off during acupuncture. According to the 2008 National Center for Health and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, 150,000 children have used acupuncture to help with headaches, back and neck pain, ADHD and anxiety. Risks associated with acupuncture are low if completed by a certified acupuncture practitioner. Some side effects include: soreness, bleeding or bruising near needle sites, internal organ injury (possibly to the lungs, if the needles are pushed in too deeply) and infectious disease if needles are reused.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Angela Johnson
Rush University Medical Center
(O) 312 563-2531
Email: angela_m_johnson@rush.edu 

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Friday, April 18 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-18 21:15:06 GMT
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
  • Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Thursday, April 17 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-17 21:15:09 GMT
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure, but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms.more>>
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure for SMA but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms, it targets mutated SMN genes, which are responsible for SMA.more>>
  • Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-16 21:15:09 GMT
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
  • Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Friday, April 11 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-11 21:15:07 GMT
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a rare type of melanoma that targets the eye. It can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a type of melanoma that targets the eye. It affects about 2,000 people a year in the United States. Although rare – it can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
  • Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Thursday, April 10 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-10 21:15:09 GMT
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
  • Pedaling For A Cure

    Pedaling For A Cure

    Wednesday, April 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
  • Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Tuesday, April 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-08 21:15:13 GMT
    CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Eric Robinson alive after he went into cardiac arrest. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
    A year ago, while jamming with his son's band, Eric Robinson went into cardiac arrest. CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Robinson alive. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
  • Helping High Risk Hearts

    Helping High Risk Hearts

    Monday, April 7 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-07 21:15:09 GMT
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
  • Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Friday, April 4 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-04 21:15:07 GMT
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
  • Predicting Bad Hearts

    Predicting Bad Hearts

    Thursday, April 3 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-03 21:15:09 GMT
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner.more>>
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. And 600,000 die of heart disease. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner; and they did it by pure accident.more>>
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.