Rep. Holt's Traffic Cam Bill Dies In Committee

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - State Representative Andy Holt's controversial traffic camera bill has died.

Holt withdrew the bill after the House Transportation Committee voted down his latest amendment to the bill.

NewChannel 5 investigation that raised questions about whether Holt benefited from the bill.

It would have put new restrictions on traffic cameras and would have kept secret the names of people who did not pay traffic camera fines.

Our investigation discovered Holt had unpaid thirteen traffic camera tickets.

After withdrawing his bill he stopped to answer questions from NewsChannel 5 Investigates, but he had a condition.

"I'll ask a question and you can ask me a question how about that," Holt said.

Minutes earlier in the House Transportation Committee fellow Republican Representative Bill Dunn ask him how many speeding tickets he had.

"So how many of those citations have been sent to your house," Dunn asked.

"Couldn't tell you," Holt responded.

After the hearing NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, "So you were asked in there how many of these tickets you received. We found that you have received 13. Does that sound right? You have received 13 tickets?

"You're the investigative reporter Ben, not me," Holt responded.

"So you've received 13," NewsChannel 5 Investigates followed.

"You're the investigative reporter Ben, not me," Holt said.

Our investigation confirmed Holt got the tickets in towns near his home.

We found 10 speeding citations from the same camera in McKenzie, Tennessee -- dating back to 2015.

We found another ticket in nearby Huntingdon and two more in Medina including one for going 72 in a 55 mile per hour zone.

He hasn't paid any of them.

Rep. Bo Mitchell (D) Davidson County said during the committee hearing, "I have a problem with that, and we as a General Assembly should have a problem with that when we know it's occurring."

But outside Holt deferred questions and asked his own.

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, "How have you received so many?"

Representative Holt responded, "Do you realize that there I think you missed an opportunity."

NewsChannel 5 Investigates said, "It's up to you to answer the questions, I'm not elected."

Holt tried to save his bill by amending the part that kept secret the names of people who have not paid their traffic camera tickets.

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, "Why did you change your bill to allow those names to be published?"

Holt responded, "Well obviously I didn't change the bill, it failed."

After our last report, when Holt refused to even stop and talk, he sent out a news release calling our report -- "fake news."

Holt asked, "My turn for a question, so you know what right now mass media on television, what the approval rating is for those folks?

NewsChannel 5 Investigates responded, "About the same as for lawmakers?"

He ended this interview after hurling accusations that lawmakers, lobbyists and some in the media were against him.

Holt promises to bring the traffic camera bill back up next year.

He says the cameras are unconstitutional.

 

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