Neurostimulation: Zapping Away Chronic Pain - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Neurostimulation: Zapping Away Chronic Pain

Posted: Updated:

NEW YORK, NY ( Ivanhoe Newswire) - 116 million Americans are living with chronic pain. A pain so intense it affects their work, their relationships, every aspect of their lives. In fact, there are more people living with chronic pain in this country than are affected by heart disease, cancer and diabetes combined. Now, doctors are using the same technology used in our smart phones to target and zap their pain.

From working 18 hours a day on Wall Street, to barely being able to make it into the subway- it's been a long painful road for Justin Carriere.

"It was an incredible, sharp shooting pain," Justin told Ivanhoe.

It started ten years ago when he slammed his snowmobile into a creek bed.

"It sent a shockwave up my back," Justin said. "I couldn't sit at all. I had to always stand up."

Pieces of Justin's disc were pressing against his sciatic nerve. Surgery only temporarily eased his pain. He also tried prescription pain killers.

"I had no energy. I just didn't feel like I was engaged. My ambition and drive at work greatly suffered," Justin said.

Now Justin's one of the first to try a new FDA approved neurostimulator to zap his pain.

"It eliminates process of the pain at the brain center," Suelanne Doouro, M.D., a pain management specialist at Beth Israel Medical Center, said.

Neurostimulators use electrodes controlled by a battery pack to send stimulation to the spinal cord, literally stopping pain signals from reaching the brain. They've been around since the 80's, but now a new stimulator is using the same technology in iPhones to better control the signals.

"New technology is so advanced, so we can call it a smart stimulator," Dr. Doouro said.

These "smart" stimulators can read a person's body movement and adjust the amount and location of electricity being sent when a person moves. Justin just got his smart stimulator.

"It took a long time to come to terms with having a mental implant in your body," Justin said.

But he can already feel the difference

"It's a very intense tingling feeling," Justin said. "It really hit the pain."

Now he's on the move again, ready to get back to business. The FDA just approved the adaptive neurostimulator a few months ago. In the latest study, 86 percent of people who tried it, found relief from their pain.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

LIVING WITH PAIN: Millions of people suffer from chronic pain on a daily basis, experiencing exactly how disruptive and destructive it can be. An estimated 26 million Americans between the ages of 20-64 suffer from frequent back pain. Back pain is the leading cause of disability in Americans under the age of 45. Pain is the second leading cause of medically related work absenteeism in the United States, resulting in more than 50 million lost workdays each year and billions of dollars. According to a chronic pain survey almost half of those surveyed felt they had little or no control over their pain. Six out of ten patients said they experience breakthrough pain one or more times daily. Chronic pain sufferers report that the pain severely affects their quality of life and overall health. (SOURCE: www.theacpa.org, www.painmed.org)

PAIN COSTS: The annual cost of chronic pain in the United States can be pricey. An estimated $100billion is spent due to healthcare expenses, lost income, and lost productivity. Costs associated with lower back pain are an estimated $85.9 billion. The total cost of arthritis—the nation's leading cause of disability—is estimated at $128 billion. Undertreated pain raises the cost of healthcare because it extends hospital stays, increases emergency room visits, and results in unexpected doctor visits. (SOURCE: www.painfoundation.org, www.ajmc.com)

TRADITIONAL TREATMENTS? Pain treatment is very difficult in many cases and patients are continually left undertreated. Pain treatment depends on the person and the severity of his or her pain, as well as his or her overall health. Furthermore, in order for doctors to give the correct treatment they must identify the pain location so they know what kind of pain they are treating. Some pain therapies include; pain killers, physical therapy, nerve decompression surgery, and acupuncture. These treatments are not successful in everyone and can lead to further complications. (SOURCE: www.webmd.com/pain-management)

NEUROSTIMULATOR THERAPY: Although neurostimulator therapy was first created many years ago, it is just recently showing promise for those suffering from chronic back pain who do not find relief from alternative treatments. Neurostimulator devices can be surgically implanted through a small incision, only leaving a small bump which is easily concealable by clothing. The stimulation provided by the system feels like a tingling and it does not make any noise. There are several different types of neurostimulators available most are battery operated or rechargeable. If rechargeable, the device can be charged externally through a wireless power charger. Rechargeable neurostimulators have an expected battery longevity of 9 years. There are several components to the neurostimulation system. Some have remote programmers that allow you and your doctors to adjust the strength and location of stimulation. Risks for this device are relatively low as it can be easily removed with surgery. (SOURCE: www.painfoundation.org, www.medtronic.com)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Jeff Jacomowitz
(212) 523-6069
jjacomo@chnet.org

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Friday, April 18 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-18 21:15:06 GMT
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
  • Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Thursday, April 17 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-17 21:15:09 GMT
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure, but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms.more>>
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure for SMA but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms, it targets mutated SMN genes, which are responsible for SMA.more>>
  • Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-16 21:15:09 GMT
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
  • Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Friday, April 11 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-11 21:15:07 GMT
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a rare type of melanoma that targets the eye. It can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a type of melanoma that targets the eye. It affects about 2,000 people a year in the United States. Although rare – it can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
  • Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Thursday, April 10 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-10 21:15:09 GMT
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
  • Pedaling For A Cure

    Pedaling For A Cure

    Wednesday, April 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
  • Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Tuesday, April 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-08 21:15:13 GMT
    CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Eric Robinson alive after he went into cardiac arrest. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
    A year ago, while jamming with his son's band, Eric Robinson went into cardiac arrest. CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Robinson alive. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
  • Helping High Risk Hearts

    Helping High Risk Hearts

    Monday, April 7 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-07 21:15:09 GMT
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
  • Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Friday, April 4 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-04 21:15:07 GMT
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
  • Predicting Bad Hearts

    Predicting Bad Hearts

    Thursday, April 3 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-03 21:15:09 GMT
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner.more>>
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. And 600,000 die of heart disease. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner; and they did it by pure accident.more>>
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.