Stop Aging In Its Tracks: Beauty Secrets To Try Today - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Stop Aging In Its Tracks: Beauty Secrets To Try Today

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WINTER PARK, FL (Ivanhoe Newswire) - As we age, our skin begins to sag, under eye circles become more apparent, our faces can look tired, even when we're not.

Like most women approaching 40, Kelly Steinhorn wants to looks as young as she can for as long as she can.

"You live once. It's not a dress rehearsal. I try to look the best that I can look," Steinhorn explained.

What is her biggest complaint?

"I have dark circles under my eyes which make you look tired," Steinhorn explained.

To turn back the clock, cosmetic surgeon Craig Vander Kolk at Mercy Medical Center said to look for a skin care cream with retinoic acid to help produce collagen.

"Retin-A allows you to get products inside and it carries in, into the deeper layers," Vander Kolk told Ivanhoe.

You can also try some natural ways like Pycnogenol. A recent study shows supplementing with 75 milligrams of the pine bark extract a day for 12 weeks increased production of a compound that makes your skin smooth by 44 percent.

Take a cue from Popeye and eat spinach. The lutein in four ounces of the green stuff can boost skin elasticity by 38 percent. Finally, spinach isn't the only go to food. Research shows eating fruits and vegetables will get your skin glowing better than a suntan can. Try eating more veggies like tomatoes and carrots.

Also, don't forget the sunscreen. It should be applied to dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before going outdoors, even in the winter.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

SIGNS OF AGING: Skin changes are the most visible sign of aging. Obvious signs of aging include wrinkles and sagging skin. Skin changes are related to genetic makeup, environmental factors, nutrition, and other factors. The greatest factor, though, is sun exposure. This can be seen by comparing areas of your body that have regular sun exposure with areas that are protected from sunlight. Natural pigments provide some protection against sun-induced skin damage. For example, blue-eyed, fair-skinned people show more aging skin changes than people with darker, more heavily pigmented skin.

AGING CHANGES: As you age the outer skin layer thins, even though the number of cell layers remains unchanged. The number of pigment-containing cells decreases, but the remaining melanocytes increase in size. Aging skin thus appears thinner, more pale, and clear. Those who have large pigmented spots (often called age spots, liver spots, or lentigos) become apparent in sun exposure. Also, the blood vessels of the dermis become more fragile, resulting in bruising, bleeding under the skin. Finally, sweat glands produce less sweat and make it harder to keep cool, putting you at an increased risk for becoming overheated or developing heat stroke. Growths such as skin tags, warts, and other blemishes are also more common in older people. (Source: www.nlm.nih.gov).

WAYS TO TURN BACK THE CLOCK: Aging can have many implications on your skin. For example, since your skin is thinner as you age it can cause breaks or tears, or blood vessels can burst. However, most people are more concerned with their skin's appearance as they age. Retinoic Acid is a nutrient that that body needs in small amounts to function and stay healthy. A form of all-trans retinoic acid made in the laboratory is put on the skin to treat conditions such as acne and is taken by mouth to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia. Skin creams that contain retinoic acid help reduce the appearance of wrinkles (Source: www.rocskincare.com, www.news-medical.net).

You can also try natural alternatives like Pycnogenol. Pycnogenol is a natural plant extract from the bark of the maritime pine tree which grows exclusively along the coast of southwest France in Les Landes de Gascogne. It represents a natural combination of procyanidins, bioflavonoids and organic acids. A recent study at Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, shows that supplementing 75 milligrams of pycnogenol a day for 12 weeks increased production of a compound that makes skin smooth by 44%. (Source: Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, www.pycnogenol.com).

FOODS TO EAT: Some foods can help your skin look younger. Spinach contains lutein, just four ounces can increase skin elasticity by 38%. Also vegetables and fruits give skin a glow better than a suntan.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Dan Collins
Mercy Medical Center
dcollins@mdmercy.com

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