Seeing Seizures: Inside Kids' Brains - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Seeing Seizures: Inside Kids' Brains

Posted: Updated:

PHOENIX (Ivanhoe Newswire) - It's what happens when too many brain cells start firing all at the same time. Nearly ten percent of Americans have a seizure at some point in their lives. But for kids, finding relief can be a special challenge, but doctors are making the seizures go away.

Twenty-five electrodes, seven days in the hospital, and hopefully an answer to one important question—why? Since she was three, 9-year-old Abby has been having seizures.

"I fall backwards. Just all of a sudden," Abby told Ivanhoe.

A special unit at Phoenix Children's Hospital attracts young seizure patients from around the U.S. Each patient is monitored 24 hours a day on simultaneous video and EEG helping doctors visualize what they see happening to what's going on in the brain.

"And we can very quickly, in a cost effective fashion supplement what's known about them, and get them to an aggressive treatment protocol. He's very conscious. Now he's having the seizure, he stops moving, he looks down," Jeffrey Buchhalter, M.D., Ph.D., an epileptologist and division chief at Phoenix Children's Hospital told Ivanhoe.

On five-year-old Kade Ashton's first day in this unit a year and a half ago, he had more than one hundred seizures. A week of constant monitoring helped doctors find the best treatment.

"They tried different combinations of medications, when one didn't work they'd increase the dose of one or try another, they just took a different approach," Brooke Ashton, Kade's mom, told Ivanhoe.

Now that Kade is on two different epilepsy medications, his mom sees plenty of smiles.

"You know, he's a normal little boy, it's wonderful," Ashton concluded.

He's normal, and seizure free.

The pediatric monitoring seizure unit at Phoenix Children's Hospital is one of only a few of its kind in the country, helping patients who have lived with seizures, but haven't had success with treatment.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

BACKGROUND: A seizure is a sudden burst of electricity in your brain, very much like a tiny bolt of lightning. This electricity is a signal that causes your body to feel different, or makes your body do things that you can't control. Sometimes the electrical signal only reaches part of your brain. Then a part of your body, like an arm or a leg, may move on its own. If the signal goes all through your brain, you may shake all over or may fall asleep for a short time. The whole seizure is usually very short—only a few seconds or perhaps a minute or so. (SOURCE: Epilepsy.com)

TYPES OF SEIZURES:
The main types of seizures according to International Classifications are Partial Seizures and Generalized seizures.

Generalized seizures include the convulsive, tonic-clonic, or Grand mal, type of seizures which people are most familiar, in which a child falls down and has jerking movements. Other types of generalized seizures include atonic seizures, which cause 'drop attacks', and absence seizures (petit mal). Absence seizures cause a brief loss of awareness and are one of the causes of staring spells. These staring spells are usually brief, lasting only about 10-15 seconds, with a return to normal awareness after the seizure and they may occur several times a day. Absence seizures can be brought on by hyperventilation and they have a characteristic EEG, with a 3-per-second spike and wave pattern.

Partial seizures, which have a focal or local onset (starting in the right leg, for example, in contrast to a generalized seizure, which begins in all parts of the body at the same time). Partial seizures may be simple, in which there is no loss of consciousness, including seizures in which a child jerks one arm or deviates his eye to one side. (SOURCE: Keepkidshealthy.com)

STOPPING SEIZURE IN ITS TRACKS! The Pediatric Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (PEMU) at Phoenix Children's Hospital is a specialized unit for children with all types of events believed to be seizures. Each patient's room is outfitted with video equipment to capture seizure activity while the child's brainwaves are recorded. The feedback received during an actual seizure leads to a more accurate diagnoses. If the brainwaves are normal during an event, seizures can usually be ruled out. Surprisingly, this applies to about one-third of all patients admitted. If the child experienced an epileptic seizure, observing the patient on video and correlating it with their EEG activity will lead to an accurate diagnosis and treatment. In each patient's room, you'll find physicians prescribing the latest therapies and nurses who are specifically trained for this complex type of care. (SOURCE: Phoenix Children's Hospital)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Allison Otu/Media Relations
Phoenix Children's Hospital
(602)933-0824
aotu@phoenixchildrens.com

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Drug To Prevent Alzheimer's

    Drug To Prevent Alzheimer's

    Tuesday, July 22 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-22 21:15:05 GMT
    Everyone-- no matter if you are a man or woman, family history or not-- with a brain is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Age is the biggest risk factor and America is aging. Right now, dozens of research sites across the country are testing an experimental drug to see if it might prevent memory loss associated with this terrible disease.more>>
    Everyone-- no matter if you are a man or woman, family history or not-- with a brain is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Age is the biggest risk factor and America is aging. Right now, dozens of research sites across the country are testing an experimental drug to see if it might prevent memory loss associated with this terrible disease.more>>
  • Could Down Syndrome Be The Key To Alzheimer's?

    Could Down Syndrome Be The Key To Alzheimer's?

    Monday, July 21 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-21 21:15:13 GMT
    More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. More than 400,000 of them also have Down syndrome. What does a condition seen at birth have in common with a disease typically diagnosed in the elderly? Quite a bit.more>>
    More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. More than 400,000 of them also have Down syndrome. What does a condition seen at birth have in common with a disease typically diagnosed in the elderly? Quite a bit.more>>
  • Extreme Workouts

    Extreme Workouts

    Friday, July 18 2014 6:04 PM EDT2014-07-18 22:04:23 GMT
    Workout routines have taken a tortuous turn. Running through mud and fighting in cages are just some of the latest extreme workouts, but one wrong move and you could be in trouble.more>>
    Workout routines have taken a tortuous turn. Running through mud and fighting in cages are just some of the latest extreme workouts, but one wrong move and you could be in trouble.more>>
  • Extreme Skin

    Extreme Skin

    Thursday, July 17 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-17 21:15:05 GMT
    Last year, Americans underwent more than 11-million cosmetic procedures and spent nearly $12-billion on skin rejuvenation. Everyone wants their skin to look younger, healthier and better, but some are taking it to an extreme.more>>
    Last year, Americans underwent more than 11-million cosmetic procedures and spent nearly $12-billion on skin rejuvenation. Everyone wants their skin to look younger, healthier and better, but some are taking it to an extreme.more>>
  • Extreme Diets

    Extreme Diets

    Wednesday, July 16 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-16 21:15:07 GMT
    Dieting is an American pastime. About 45-million of us diet each year, and we spend about $33-billion on weight-loss products. There are more ways to diet than ever and some are pretty extreme.more>>
    Dieting is an American pastime. About 45-million of us diet each year, and we spend about $33-billion on weight-loss products. There are more ways to diet than ever and some are pretty extreme.more>>
  • Frozen Lumpectomy For Prostate

    Frozen Lumpectomy For Prostate

    Tuesday, July 15 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-15 21:15:08 GMT
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American Cancer Society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.more>>
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American Cancer Society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.more>>
  • Bariatric Surgery For Diabetes

    Bariatric Surgery For Diabetes

    Wednesday, July 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Nearly 90 percent of people with type-two diabetes are obese and as more Americans gain weight, more will likely face a diabetes diagnosis. In fact, the American Diabetes Association predicts that one in three adults will have diabetes by the year 2050. For years, we’ve heard about weight loss surgery and its effect on diabetes. Now, a new study is showing how well the popular surgery is working to stop this serious disease.more>>
    Nearly 90 percent of people with type-two diabetes are obese and as more Americans gain weight, more will likely face a diabetes diagnosis. In fact, the American Diabetes Association predicts that one in three adults will have diabetes by the year 2050. For years, we’ve heard about weight loss surgery and its effect on diabetes. Now, a new study is showing how well the popular surgery is working to stop this serious disease.more>>
  • Ankle Replacement

    Ankle Replacement

    Tuesday, July 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-08 21:15:10 GMT
    More than 50 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis. Between 6 percent and 13 percent of them have ankle arthritis. These patients feel pain with every single step they take, but now ankle replacements are giving patients a new lease on life.more>>
    More than 50 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis. Between 6 percent and 13 percent of them have ankle arthritis. These patients feel pain with every single step they take, but now ankle replacements are giving patients a new lease on life.more>>
  • 3D Knee

    3D Knee

    Monday, July 7 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-07 21:15:09 GMT
    In the past ten years, the number of total knee replacements in the U.S. has doubled and many of those patients are much younger than ever before. Now, new technology allows doctors to make replacement knees that are the perfect fit.more>>
    In the past ten years, the number of total knee replacements in the U.S. has doubled and many of those patients are much younger than ever before. Now, new technology allows doctors to make replacement knees that are the perfect fit.more>>
  • Breath of Life for Heart Patients

    Breath of Life for Heart Patients

    Thursday, July 3 2014 6:20 PM EDT2014-07-03 22:20:13 GMT
    Heart failure, 5.7 million people in the U.S. have it and 55-thousand die from it each year. By definition, it means your heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to support all your other organs. Now, a simple breath test could make it easier and faster for doctors to diagnose.more>>
    Heart failure, 5.7 million people in the U.S. have it and 55-thousand die from it each year. By definition, it means your heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to support all your other organs. Now, a simple breath test could make it easier and faster for doctors to diagnose.more>>
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.