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Olympic Training Secrets: How To Run Like A Ferrari

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CLERMONT, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) - 9.69 seconds. That's how long it took Jamaica's Usain Bolt to become the fastest man on earth back in 2008. Since then Olympic track and field stars have spent countless hours training for critical seconds. We take you inside the gym and inside the minds of track stars to get their training tips and hints.

What looks like an Olympic photo-shoot, is a rare rest-day with fans, but for a glimpse into their daily grind, all you have to do is ask.

Interval runs, sprinting, hurdling…it's what coach Dennis Mitchell calls…

"Hard work and hard work," is what coach Dennis Mitchell calls interval runs, sprinting, and hurdling.

While your work may never get you to the Olympics, there are ways to improve your training, starting in your own backyard.

For sprinter Curtis Mitchell…

"The most important thing as a runner is that you have to push through on your down days. The days you don't feel good are the most important days," Curtis Mitchell, 100/200 meter sprinter, told Ivanhoe.

To push through, do what you love.

"I love abs. I love the weight room," Damu Cherry-Mitchell, an Olympic hurdler, told Ivanhoe.

World champ Tyson Gay runs for a living,but there are two other "R" words on his mind.

"I believe in rest," Gay told Ivanhoe.

He also believes in rehydration, so don't forget to fuel up.

"You're a Ferrari, the fuel you put in your Ferrari dictates how that car runs from day to day," Coach Mitchell explained.

It's something Justin Gatlin preaches .Gatlin won gold in 2004 but lean meats and portioned meals helped him trim more than just his run time.

"I was like 210, 205 pounds, now I'm down to 182," Gatlin told Ivanhoe

And gold isn't the only reward their after.

"That one cheat day of the week where I eat whatever I want," Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, an Olympic gold medalist told Ivanhoe.

"Oh my gosh, I love gummies and cupcakes," Cherry-Mitchell laughed.

So what's former Olympian, and current coach, Dennis Mitchell's best training secret?

"Well I'd tell you, but as everyone says I'd have to kill you," Coach Mitchell said.

The opening ceremony for the London 2012 Olympic games kicks off Friday, July 27. For a full schedule of the Olympic Games visit http://www.london2012.com/schedule-and-results/

RESEARCH SUMMARY

2012 SUMMER OLYMPIC GAMES: The games of the XXX Olympiad, will take place in London, England, United Kingdom, from 27 July to 12 August 2012. London will become the first city to officially host the modern Olympic Games three times having previously done so in1908 and in 1948. Athletes from 204 National Olympic Committees are expected to participate. As of 5 June 2012, 185 countries have qualified at least one athlete. The 2012 Summer Olympics features 26 sports and a total of 39 disciplines. The 2012 Paralympic Games has 20 sports and 21 disciplines. For the first time, women's boxing is included, with 40 athletes competing in five different weight classes

OLYMPIC TRAINING: American Council on Exercise spokesperson Todd Durkin offers tips for training like an Olympic athlete:

  • DIET AND HYDRATION: For Olympic-level performance and off-the-chart energy, you must eat properly including eating a breakfast of complex carbohydrates and lean protein, then eat again every 3-4 hours and within 90 minutes of working out. Consume half your bodyweight in fluid ounces of pure water and if exercising intensely or for long duration, consume a sports-drink such as Gatorade.
  • SNOOZE: High-level athletes that are training hard need 8-10 hours sleep. Focus on quality of sleep by going to bed before 11 p.m. for optimal hormonal release don't use a computer or watch TV within 30 minutes of sleeping to avoid effects of electromagnetic waves and make your sleeping environment as dark as possible.
  • PROPER WARM-UP AND RECOVERY: After 10 minutes of a light jog or jump rope session, spend 10-15 minutes on dynamic warm-ups such as skipping or reverse lunges to (improve flexibility, coordination, rhythm and naturally prevent injuries from occurring). After your workout, incorporate recovery techniques and stretching/flexibility exercises to reduce pain or soreness.
  • GET CREATIVE: Instead of only using fixed-pieces of equipment, try medicine balls or Swiss Balls and integrate diagonal and rotational actions as well as unilateral exercises. Run. Jump. Throw.
  • LIFT HEAVY: In order to be great, you must challenge yourself to attain maximum strength gains. Attempt 2-3 sets of a "big" lift of 4-6 reps once a week. In addition to getting strong, lifting heavy will maximize hormonal response.
  • TRAIN EARLY IN THE DAY: Olympic athletes do it. So can you. You are much less likely to get distractions early in the morning that will prevent you from your workout and you will feel great all day. (SOURCE: Men's Health)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Kim Couch
Media Relations
Kim.couch@orlandohealth.com

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