Beats For Better Health - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Beats For Better Health

Posted: Updated:

NEW YORK ( Ivanhoe Newswire) - What's your favorite song? What artist gets you pumped up? Who do you listen to when you fall asleep? From Nicki Minaj to Mozart, new research shows the music you love could impact your health.

New science is proving music can relieve anxiety, increase memory, energize your body, organize your brain, improve your mood and help you fight off stress, insomnia, pain, depression and even addiction.

"We're trying to put some science behind music and show people how they can use it to call up the frame of mind they want for very specific situations on a daily basis," psychologist Joseph Cardillo, Ph.D. told Ivanhoe.

"Music can influence your behavior, your thinking, your emotions," Galina Mindlin, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at Columbia University told Ivanhoe.

The authors of the book, "Your Playlist Can Change Your Life" say science proves that like sex, drugs or really good food, music causes the brain to release dopamine, a chemical that's key to addiction and motivation. Once a person can figure out which songs help to release dopamine, they can control it and use it to their advantage.

"It's affecting your brain waves and your blood chemistry," Dr. Cardillo explained.

Using music to affect your life starts with creating a playlist. First, pick songs you like a lot. Figure out how many beats there are per minute. Norah Jone's ‘Turn Me On' has 56 beats, compared to Michael Jackson's ‘Beat It" at 139. The more beats, the more energizing the song.

"You can really rewire your brain," Dr. Mindlin said.

Once you have a certain song that works at a certain time, ingrain that song into your memory. Play it when you need it. Then make a playlist that's task oriented: one for driving, one for jogging, one for meditation, one for stressful situations, one for work.

"If you do it over and over again, your mind will automatically bring up that mindset for that particular task," Dr. Cardillo said.

Kevin Hall uses music therapy to help him get to sleep. He's had insomnia since he was 13 years old.

"One day I went to bed at nine o'clock and I laid there and laid there and just stared at my ceiling," Kevin told Ivanhoe.

After incorporating a soothing playlist into his life, Kevin was sleeping for eight hours a night. It took him three weeks, with five minute sessions each day.

"It's to the point where I don't need the song anymore. I have it recorded in my brain. Now so when I need it, I can just start playing it in my head," Kevin said.

As for improving memory, they say to choose a song from your distant past. That will put your brain into remembering mode and prepare your mind to begin memorizing your notes or presentation. When you need to recall what you learned, play the song beforehand and you'll be able to remember it quicker.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

THE "MOZART EFFECT": Frances Rauscher researched whether or not music had any effect on people's spatio-temporal reasoning abilities by having groups listen to 10 minutes of Mozart's "Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major" and then having them complete a paper folding task. The results showed that listening to the music increased scores by 48% compared to control groups, but the effects lasted only about 10 minutes and music not as highly structured as Mozart's did not have the same effects. This was deemed the "Mozart Effect" and demonstrated how music and sound can affect intelligence as well as other things in humans, positively and negatively.

MUSIC & HEALTH: Music has also shown to have an effect on people's health in several different ways. For one, music can help in recovery. Melodic intonation therapy, which is speaking in a strongly musical manner, has shown to promote recovery from aphasia in stroke patients who had failed to recover spontaneously after a prolonged period, and the same Mozart song used in Rauscher's research proved to reduce seizures in epileptic patients by 65% compared to silence. It can also reduce depression symptoms in home-bound elderly people as well as reduce post-surgical stress and pain. (Source: www.rmhiherbal.org)

RELATIONSHIP TO SOUND: Humans have a complex relationship to sound. Some facts about how music plays a role in people's lives are outlined below:

  • Ancient flutes, one presumed to be the oldest musical instrument in the world, furthers the argument that music ability and interest were present even very early on in human history.
  • Scientists have found that music stimulates more parts of the brain than any other human function.
  • Fetuses begin to develop their auditory system between 17 and 19 weeks, and thanks to the scientist Sheila Woodward in the 1990s we know that not only can be heard inside the womb but fetuses heart rates become slightly elevated, showing a reaction and that they can actually hear the music.
  • Other studies have also found that when a pregnant women listens to music, even through headphones, the fetus can echo the mother's response to the quality of music. Their heart rates lower when the mother's listening to music she finds relaxing and increases when the mother listens to something she finds stressful. (Source: www.npr.org)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Joseph Cardillo, PhD
(528) 629-8595
cihya@nycap.rr.com

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Friday, April 18 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-18 21:15:06 GMT
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
  • Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Thursday, April 17 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-17 21:15:09 GMT
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure, but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms.more>>
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure for SMA but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms, it targets mutated SMN genes, which are responsible for SMA.more>>
  • Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-16 21:15:09 GMT
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
  • Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Friday, April 11 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-11 21:15:07 GMT
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a rare type of melanoma that targets the eye. It can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a type of melanoma that targets the eye. It affects about 2,000 people a year in the United States. Although rare – it can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
  • Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Thursday, April 10 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-10 21:15:09 GMT
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
  • Pedaling For A Cure

    Pedaling For A Cure

    Wednesday, April 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
  • Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Tuesday, April 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-08 21:15:13 GMT
    CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Eric Robinson alive after he went into cardiac arrest. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
    A year ago, while jamming with his son's band, Eric Robinson went into cardiac arrest. CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Robinson alive. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
  • Helping High Risk Hearts

    Helping High Risk Hearts

    Monday, April 7 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-07 21:15:09 GMT
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
    Ironing is not exactly Barbara Roy's favorite activity, but it's something she's glad she can do again. Her doctor diagnosed her with severe aortic stenosis.more>>
  • Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Hernias In Newborns: Lincoln's Story

    Friday, April 4 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-04 21:15:07 GMT
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias occur in about one in every 2,000 births. They can be deadly, but now doctors are using a more aggressive treatment approach.more>>
  • Predicting Bad Hearts

    Predicting Bad Hearts

    Thursday, April 3 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-03 21:15:09 GMT
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner.more>>
    Every year, more than 700,000 Americans have a heart attack. And 600,000 die of heart disease. Now, researchers at Baylor Research Institute at Dallas have uncovered a biomarker that may help them spot the disease sooner; and they did it by pure accident.more>>
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.