The Long And Short Of It: Health Clues In Fingers & Arms? - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

The Long And Short Of It: Health Clues In Fingers & Arms?

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ORLANDO, Fla. (Ivanhoe Newswire) - From cancer to stroke to Alzheimer's, clues to conditions you may be at risk for are hiding in plain sight. Your body parts may hold some important health secrets.

For instance, Redheads feel more pain. A study shows a mutation of the gene responsible for red hair, may also control the way the brain regulates pain sensitivity.

If you fly off the handle, check your fingers.

A study in the Journal of Communications found if you have a smaller index finger than ring finger, you're likely to be more verbally aggressive.  A 2010 study shows, men whose index fingers were longer than their ring fingers, were one-third less likely to get prostate cancer. Short people may have the last laugh. A study in the Western Journal of Medicine found the onset of chronic disease is often delayed in smaller bodies.

Your arm length could be a tell-tale sign of Alzheimer's. Women with arms less than 60 inches across may be one and a half times more likely to develop the disease.

Women with smaller calves could have a higher risk of stroke.

Also take a look at your finger and toenails.  If the very base is purple or blue, it could indicate a heart issue.

One more thing, what's your favorite smell? If your nose doesn't know, it could mean trouble. A lack of the sense of smell is related to the onset of Parkinson's.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

WHAT YOUR BODY PARTS SAYS ABOUT YOUR HEALTH: From the color of a person's hair to the hand one writes with; some researchers believe that genetics may help forecast the risk of certain health issues. They can also be a gateway into revealing why some people develop certain personalities.

What Your Feet Say: If your toes are always cold, one reason could be poor blood flow -- a circulatory problem sometimes linked to smoking, high blood pressure, or heart disease. The nerve damage of uncontrolled diabetes can also make your feet feel cold to you. Other possible causes include hypothyroidism and anemia. A doctor can look for any underlying problems -- or let you know that you simply have cold feet. (Source: www.webmd.com)

What Your Nails Say: A touch of white here, a rosy tinge there, or some rippling or bumps may be a sign of disease in the body. Problems in the liver, lungs, and heart can show up in your nails. (Source: www.webmd.com)

What Your Skin Says: Many underlying health conditions -- some very serious -- first appear as skin problems. For example:

  • A butterfly rash across the face is often the first sign of lupus.
  • Velvety plaques in the neck and/or armpit suggest diabetes. This condition -- acanthosis nigricans -- could be benign or be caused by obesity. But it is very often a sign of diabetes.

(Source: www.webmd.com)

WHAT THE HAND YOU WRITE WITH SAYS: Studies reveal that left handed people tend to be more creative than their right-handed counter-parts, but there are also some studies that show that left-handed people tend to suffer from anxiety more than right handed people. (Source:www.mentalhealthy.co.uk)

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