Local Family's Relatives Killed In Syrian Chemical Attack - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Local Family's Relatives Killed In Syrian Chemical Attack

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Louai Faour and his wife, Dima moved to the United States from Syria in 2008. Louai Faour and his wife, Dima moved to the United States from Syria in 2008.
Louai Faour's sister lost her eye after attacks in Syria. She was able to escape to Lebanon. Louai Faour's sister lost her eye after attacks in Syria. She was able to escape to Lebanon.

by Nick Beres

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. – A Rutherford County has watched as chemical weapons attacks in Syria claimed the life of several family members and left an injured sister running for her life.

For Louai Faour and his wife, Dima, the crisis in Syria is not just a news story. It's their life.

The couple moved to the United States in 2008. They now live in Murfreesboro. The family they left behind has been dying. They said it took the chemical weapons an instant.

"It happened in like two minutes, three minutes. Everything was done," said Faour.

The attack claimed Faour's aunt and young nephew. A photo sent by his sister showed his uncle's body. She was also badly injured -- taking a piece of shrapnel to her eye.

To make matters worse, Faour said Syrian authorities look to arrest injured civilians on the spot as enemies of the state.

Faour said they were afraid the government would kill his sister.

"Maybe the government is going to kill her or take her. It's dangerous," he said.

The family hatched a plan to get the sister out of the country. She hid for three days until the bleeding stopped.

"They took the bandage off and put the sunglasses on and they went through the checkpoint," said Faour.

The military police never saw the injury and the family was able to drive the 63 miles from Damascus, Syria to safety in Beirut, Lebanon.

Faour said he feared President Bashar Al Assad would use chemical weapons again.

"He would do anything to stay in power – anything. Even if he has to kill everyone. He don't care," said Faour.

Once in Beirut, Faour's sister was able to get medical care. She was admitted to a local hospital for surgery.

Unfortunately, she lost the injured eye because she had to wait those three days hiding from the Syrian government before seeking treatment.

Email: nberes@newschannel5.com
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