Stroke Rehab: It's Never Too Late - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Stroke Rehab: It's Never Too Late

Posted: Updated:

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Ivanhoe Newswire) - Strokes are the third leading cause of death in this country. They are the leading cause of disability among adults. It was once thought that whatever mobility stroke survivors had after two years, that's all they would ever get, but researchers are developing new technology that's proving that fact wrong.

Seven years ago, Todd Daniels couldn't stand on his own.

"I suffered a brain injury, a traumatic brain injury," Todd Daniels told Ivanhoe.

As a result, Todd suffered a stroke.

"My family was told I would always need to be in a nursing home and I would never walk again," Todd said.

Determination is finally proving the experts wrong.

Todd is one of the first to use a new bionic arm, tested at The Ohio State University, to help him regain movement.

"The pads pick up the intention, or the desire, for the patient to move. Then, the robot detects that and basically amplifies that desire to move," Stephen Page, PhD, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, told Ivanhoe.

For Todd, the study's been a success.

"When he first started the study, the only time he could actually do any motion was involuntarily. So, now he's doing it voluntarily," Heather Tanksley, Occupational Therapy Student, The Ohio State University, told Ivanhoe.

Dr. Page believes with the repetitive use of the bionic arm, a patient's brain is being rewired.

"Areas that maybe weren't being used or dedicated to a certain movement, like moving the arm, can actually be used," Dr. Page said.

Also, just how much a stroke patient is improving is, for the first time, being measured by the same technology used in your smart phone.

"When we turn it one way, or the another way, the screen change—so it's sensitive to movement," Dr. Page said.

Accelerometers, which measure the acceleration and direction of body movements, are placed on each ankle, both arms, and across the chest.

"We are able to determine how well, how fast, and how efficiently a stroke survivor is moving," Dr. Page explained.

"Just gaining some motion back was just a huge step," Todd explained.

Dr. Page believes that stroke patients in recovery, even ten years after a stroke and possibly throughout the rest of their lives, can continue to increase their mobility. He hopes the bionic arm will be able to go home with the patients to help them do simple tasks around the house more easily.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

BACKGROUND:  A stroke or "brain attack" occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery or a blood vessel breaks, disrupting blood flow to an area of the brain.  When either of these things happens, brain cells begin to die and brain damage occurs.  Whenever brain cells die during a stroke, abilities controlled by that area of the brain are lost.  These abilities include speech, movement, and memory.  (Source: www.stroke.org)

SMART PHONE TECHNOLOGY:  People love their smartphones, but many of us take for grant the technology that is packed into our phones and tablets.  Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are inspired by it.  They are the first to test the innovative approach that combines blue tooth technology with a computer program that charts the movement of a patient's arms and legs during rehabilitation.  "These moving body parts are in a constant state of motion, but with this technology we can figure out how they are all working together. This gives us the ability to objectively, precisely, figure out at the bedside or in a rehab facility, how well someone is improving," Stephen Page, PhD, FAHA, an occupational therapist at The Ohio State University Medical Center, was quoted as saying. Six sensors are placed on the participants' arms, legs, and chest. As the person walks the sensors relate information to each other and back to a computer that charts how and where the person is moving.

Researchers are using this new technology to evaluate progress in a study that is combining electrical muscle stimulation, which has been used to improve muscle function for decades, with active motion on a recumbent bicycle.  The goal of the study is to determine whether the combination of active motion and electrical stimulation provides added benefit for the patient through neuroplasticity, or retraining the brain.  The first part of the study will examine ten people.  Over the course of ten weeks, half of the participants will get the electrical stimulation on their legs while biking, and the other half will get a placebo.  (Source:http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/Pages/index.aspx)

"BIONIC ARM":   Dr. Stephen Page says that close to 80 percent of stroke survivors have difficulties with arm movement.  Most therapists have assumed for many years that there was only a small window of opportunity to rehabilitate arms that were damaged by a stroke.  They would focus on the arms in the early stages of rehab.  Dr. Page launched a new study to help change this notion.  The study uses a hi-tech elbow brace known as "bionic arm."  "All of our muscles have what's called EMG or electromyography. It is essentially a signal that our muscle sends out when it's moving, or attempting to move," he said.  "When the patients attempt to move, even if it's slow, or not even visible, this device will magnify those attempts to move and the robot inside will kick in and help them to move the rest of the way," Dr. Page was quoted as saying.  Researchers believe that the brain can actually be retrained to move the arm on its own, regardless of how long ago a patient had a stroke. They think the repetitive use of the "bionic arm" will rewire the patients' brains.  (Source: http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/Pages/index.aspx)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Steve Page, PhD, OTR/L, FAHA
Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
stephen.page@osumc.edu

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Drug To Prevent Alzheimer's

    Drug To Prevent Alzheimer's

    Tuesday, July 22 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-22 21:15:05 GMT
    Everyone-- no matter if you are a man or woman, family history or not-- with a brain is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Age is the biggest risk factor and America is aging. Right now, dozens of research sites across the country are testing an experimental drug to see if it might prevent memory loss associated with this terrible disease.more>>
    Everyone-- no matter if you are a man or woman, family history or not-- with a brain is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Age is the biggest risk factor and America is aging. Right now, dozens of research sites across the country are testing an experimental drug to see if it might prevent memory loss associated with this terrible disease.more>>
  • Could Down Syndrome Be The Key To Alzheimer's?

    Could Down Syndrome Be The Key To Alzheimer's?

    Monday, July 21 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-21 21:15:13 GMT
    More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. More than 400,000 of them also have Down syndrome. What does a condition seen at birth have in common with a disease typically diagnosed in the elderly? Quite a bit.more>>
    More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. More than 400,000 of them also have Down syndrome. What does a condition seen at birth have in common with a disease typically diagnosed in the elderly? Quite a bit.more>>
  • Extreme Workouts

    Extreme Workouts

    Friday, July 18 2014 6:04 PM EDT2014-07-18 22:04:23 GMT
    Workout routines have taken a tortuous turn. Running through mud and fighting in cages are just some of the latest extreme workouts, but one wrong move and you could be in trouble.more>>
    Workout routines have taken a tortuous turn. Running through mud and fighting in cages are just some of the latest extreme workouts, but one wrong move and you could be in trouble.more>>
  • Extreme Skin

    Extreme Skin

    Thursday, July 17 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-17 21:15:05 GMT
    Last year, Americans underwent more than 11-million cosmetic procedures and spent nearly $12-billion on skin rejuvenation. Everyone wants their skin to look younger, healthier and better, but some are taking it to an extreme.more>>
    Last year, Americans underwent more than 11-million cosmetic procedures and spent nearly $12-billion on skin rejuvenation. Everyone wants their skin to look younger, healthier and better, but some are taking it to an extreme.more>>
  • Extreme Diets

    Extreme Diets

    Wednesday, July 16 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-16 21:15:07 GMT
    Dieting is an American pastime. About 45-million of us diet each year, and we spend about $33-billion on weight-loss products. There are more ways to diet than ever and some are pretty extreme.more>>
    Dieting is an American pastime. About 45-million of us diet each year, and we spend about $33-billion on weight-loss products. There are more ways to diet than ever and some are pretty extreme.more>>
  • Frozen Lumpectomy For Prostate

    Frozen Lumpectomy For Prostate

    Tuesday, July 15 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-15 21:15:08 GMT
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American Cancer Society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.more>>
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American Cancer Society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.more>>
  • Bariatric Surgery For Diabetes

    Bariatric Surgery For Diabetes

    Wednesday, July 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Nearly 90 percent of people with type-two diabetes are obese and as more Americans gain weight, more will likely face a diabetes diagnosis. In fact, the American Diabetes Association predicts that one in three adults will have diabetes by the year 2050. For years, we’ve heard about weight loss surgery and its effect on diabetes. Now, a new study is showing how well the popular surgery is working to stop this serious disease.more>>
    Nearly 90 percent of people with type-two diabetes are obese and as more Americans gain weight, more will likely face a diabetes diagnosis. In fact, the American Diabetes Association predicts that one in three adults will have diabetes by the year 2050. For years, we’ve heard about weight loss surgery and its effect on diabetes. Now, a new study is showing how well the popular surgery is working to stop this serious disease.more>>
  • Ankle Replacement

    Ankle Replacement

    Tuesday, July 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-08 21:15:10 GMT
    More than 50 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis. Between 6 percent and 13 percent of them have ankle arthritis. These patients feel pain with every single step they take, but now ankle replacements are giving patients a new lease on life.more>>
    More than 50 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis. Between 6 percent and 13 percent of them have ankle arthritis. These patients feel pain with every single step they take, but now ankle replacements are giving patients a new lease on life.more>>
  • 3D Knee

    3D Knee

    Monday, July 7 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-07-07 21:15:09 GMT
    In the past ten years, the number of total knee replacements in the U.S. has doubled and many of those patients are much younger than ever before. Now, new technology allows doctors to make replacement knees that are the perfect fit.more>>
    In the past ten years, the number of total knee replacements in the U.S. has doubled and many of those patients are much younger than ever before. Now, new technology allows doctors to make replacement knees that are the perfect fit.more>>
  • Breath of Life for Heart Patients

    Breath of Life for Heart Patients

    Thursday, July 3 2014 6:20 PM EDT2014-07-03 22:20:13 GMT
    Heart failure, 5.7 million people in the U.S. have it and 55-thousand die from it each year. By definition, it means your heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to support all your other organs. Now, a simple breath test could make it easier and faster for doctors to diagnose.more>>
    Heart failure, 5.7 million people in the U.S. have it and 55-thousand die from it each year. By definition, it means your heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to support all your other organs. Now, a simple breath test could make it easier and faster for doctors to diagnose.more>>
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.