Frightening nutrition facts on Halloween candy - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Frightening nutrition facts on Halloween candy

Updated: Sep 16, 2013 03:19 PM
© Pixland / Thinkstock © Pixland / Thinkstock


By Matthew Cenzon

Aside from the necessary precautions that all parents should take to ensure their child has a safe Halloween experience, one thing that is commonly overlooked is the amount of calories, sugar and fat a child might ingest from his or her Halloween candy. Since most fun-sized candy wrappers lack any nutritional information, here is a list of some of the most popular Halloween candies and their nutrition facts.

Butterfinger

Nestle's popular Butterfinger candy bar is known for its crunchy texture and peanut-butter taste. But what exactly is your child eating other than a chocolate covered, peanut-butter crisp? According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a fun-size Butterfinger candy bar has roughly 83 calories. In case you were wondering how many calories are in a full size bar, try a whopping 275 calories. Make sure you monitor how many of these little candy bars are in your child's Halloween bag.

Mounds

Mounds candy bars, made by Hershey's, are chocolate bars with a coconut center. Without the addition of peanut-butter, caramel or some form of nut, a fun-sized Mounds bar doesn't sound all that bad, right? However, these coconut candy bars have 92 calories in a snack-sized, 19-gram package according to the USDA. In a report featured on MSNBC, Mounds bars were also reported to have the highest content of saturated fat amongst 37 candies that were surveyed. This sounds like one coconut candy you may want to skip out on.

Snickers Bar

Mars has marketed their Snickers bar as being a filling candy bar that can satisfy the deepest of hungers. And who can argue with them? Chocolate, peanuts, caramel and nougat sound like a heavy combination and make-up the average Snickers bar in its entirety. However, these hefty candy bars serve up 280 calories in a normal-sized bar according to Self magazine, along with 30 grams of sugar. Even in the smaller, bite-size or fun-size versions, these candy bars can be potential calorie busters to those who aren't careful.

Twix

Another popular, Halloween candy bar made by Mars is the Twix chocolate bar. While the normal version features two chocolate covered biscuits with caramel, the Halloween variety that is often served to trick-or-treaters is much smaller in size, and labeled as "Twix Miniatures". While eating just one of these mini-Twix candies isn't so bad, their addictiveness is where the problem lies. According to Men's Health Magazine, popping three of these bite-sized, Twix candies can add up to 150 calories, 8 grams of fat and 15 grams of sugar. Now imagine how bad it would be if you were to eat more than just three pieces.

Reese's Peanut Butter Cup

Popular for its size, shape and peanut butter center, Reese's Peanut Butter Cups are a Halloween favorite for all ages. During the Halloween season, you may see these candies in a variety of sizes. If you want a general idea of the nutritional information for just one peanut butter cup, here is some data from the USDA:

Serving size: 17 grams (one cup)
Calories: 88
Fat: 5.19 grams
Sugars: 8.02 grams

Be wary of the Halloween-themed, Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkin. These pumpkin-shaped peanut butter cups contain 170 calories per package, 10 grams of fat and 16 grams of sugar. That's one festive calorie bomb.

M & M's Plain

These mini-chocolates with a candy-coated shell are no prize on the nutritional scale either. With 90 calories, 4 grams of fat and 11.5 grams of sugar in a fun-sized pack, they're just as bad as the other popular, Halloween candies on this list. In case you were wondering, the peanut variety is just as bad as the plain, if not slightly worse at 93 calories in a fun-size pack.

Halloween Candy Tips

Instead of handing out candy, think of healthy treats you can distribute to trick-or-treaters.

Discard any candies that have been opened, or look like they've been tampered with.

Don't allow your kids to eat their candy all at once, distribute it back to them over time in small portions.

Allow your kids to trade the candy for special prizes. Then, take the candy and donate it to charity instead of eating it all yourself.

Give your child a smaller trick-or-treat bag or container so they aren't coming home with an absurd amount of candy.

If your child receives a full-sized or king-sized candy, limit that to their one candy for the day.

Make sure to serve your kids a healthy, hearty meal so they'll be too full to eat the candy they come home with.

Sources:

USDA
Self
MSNBC
Men's Health
FitSugar
Mayo Clinic

 

This article was originally posted on SymptomFind.com

Content provided by:

  • Medical News HeadlinesMedical News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Growing Stem Cells In Space?

    Growing Stem Cells In Space?

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-23 21:15:09 GMT
    Hemorrhagic stroke is responsible for more than 30 percent of all stroke deaths. It happens when a weakened blood vessel ruptures and bleeds into the brain.more>>
    Hemorrhagic stroke is responsible for more than 30 percent of all stroke deaths. It happens when a weakened blood vessel ruptures and bleeds into the brain.more>>
  • New Laser Treatment Stops Some Epileptic Seizures

    New Laser Treatment Stops Some Epileptic Seizures

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 6:00 PM EDT2014-04-22 22:00:21 GMT
    More than two million adults in the United States have epilepsy and 150,000 more will develop the condition each year. Usually, medication can control seizures, but about 30 percent of patients do not respond. Now, patients have a new treatment option that uses lasers to stop the seizures.
    more>>
    More than two million adults in the United States have epilepsy and 150,000 more will develop the condition each year. Usually, medication can control seizures, but about 30 percent of patients do not respond. Now, patients have a new treatment option that uses lasers to stop the seizures.

    more>>
  • Heating Up Breast Cancer

    Heating Up Breast Cancer

    Monday, April 21 2014 6:15 PM EDT2014-04-21 22:15:09 GMT
    Two years ago, doctors told Lisa Ridgeway she had triple negative breast cancer, a very aggressive disease with no cure. Lisa had surgery, radiation, and chemo, but her cancer came back two more times. Now she’s trying something new.
    more>>
    Two years ago, doctors told Lisa Ridgeway she had triple negative breast cancer, a very aggressive disease with no cure. Lisa had surgery, radiation, and chemo, but her cancer came back two more times. Now she’s trying something new.

    more>>
  • Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Migraine Relief: Stopping Pain & Relieving Pressure

    Friday, April 18 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-18 21:15:06 GMT
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
    Meredith Messerli is thankful she can study without pain. The college freshman spent two years of her life battling severe migraines.more>>
  • Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Hope For Lanie: Curing SMA

    Thursday, April 17 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-17 21:15:09 GMT
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure, but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms.more>>
    SMA attacks the body's motor neurons and causes paralysis. There is no cure for SMA but for the first time doctors are studying an experimental therapy that targets more than just symptoms, it targets mutated SMN genes, which are responsible for SMA.more>>
  • Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Washing Lungs & Breathing Better

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-16 21:15:09 GMT
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
    Imagine not being able to breathe without struggling: every breath you take is work; every breath you take could be your last. That was the case for one man who became dependent on an oxygen tank to stay alive.more>>
  • Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Ocular Melanoma: Saving Lives, Saving Eyes

    Friday, April 11 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-11 21:15:07 GMT
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a rare type of melanoma that targets the eye. It can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
    Ocular melanoma, also called uveal melanoma, is a type of melanoma that targets the eye. It affects about 2,000 people a year in the United States. Although rare – it can be a deadly if it isn't spotted early enough. Now, there's a way to treat patients that's saving lives and saving eyes.more>>
  • Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Memory Palace: Coping With Chemo Brain

    Thursday, April 10 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-10 21:15:09 GMT
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
    More than 13 million Americans are living with some form of cancer. Harsh treatments like chemo and radiation save lives, but they will also change lives. Now, many cancer survivors are learning how to cope with chemo brain.more>>
  • Pedaling For A Cure

    Pedaling For A Cure

    Wednesday, April 9 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-09 21:15:09 GMT
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
    Five years ago, Leslie Trudeau's world came crashing down. At just 22 years old, her son Taylor lost his battle with leukemia. That's why Trudeau is pedaling for a cure.more>>
  • Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Bringing Hearts Back To Life: New Improved Defibrillator

    Tuesday, April 8 2014 5:15 PM EDT2014-04-08 21:15:13 GMT
    CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Eric Robinson alive after he went into cardiac arrest. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
    A year ago, while jamming with his son's band, Eric Robinson went into cardiac arrest. CPR and a portable defibrillator helped keep Robinson alive. And now a newly FDA approved Biotronik implantable cardiac defibrillator, or ICD, constantly monitors his heart.more>>
*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.