The Bitter Truth Behind Sugar & Diabetes - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

The Bitter Truth Behind Sugar & Diabetes

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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (Ivanhoe Newswire) - You may have heard the phrase, "a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down," but could it be sugar that's creating our health problems to begin with? With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicting one in three people will have diabetes by 2050, it's something we all need to pay attention to.

Sugar, the average American diet includes more than 30 teaspoons of it a day; when it should only include six for women and nine for men. It's a big reason why Rocco LoBosco believes he got type 2 diabetes.

"I was a cookie freak," Rocco told Ivanhoe.

A recent Stanford University study found the more sugar in a population's food supply, the higher the rate of diabetes, independent of obesity rates.

"We don't need to have this level of disease," Richard Jacoby, DPM, Medical Director, Scottsdale Neuropathy Institute, told Ivanhoe.

Doctor Richard Jacoby knows what too much sugar can do. His patients, like Rocco, face amputation because of out of control type 2 diabetes.

Rocco lost his toe and sugar's impact doesn't stop there.

"Sugar is considered the number one culprit in cancer disease, as well as diabetic neuropathy, cardiac, and stroke," Dr. Jacoby said.

The silent killer comes camouflaged in other foods as well.

"Wheat, bread, any grain is sugar," Dr. Jacoby said.

Those foods trigger an insulin response in the body leading to weight gain.

"Six to eleven helpings of grains a day, that's absurd. That's why we are all diabetic," Dr. Jacoby said.

Instead, Dr. Jacoby recommends a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids and oils, grass fed meat and veggies.

"If it tastes good, don't eat it, and that means it has sugar in it. If you do that you will lose weight and your diabetes will go away," Dr. Jacoby said.

Rocco has lost 34 pounds since starting the diet and has his blood sugar under control.

 "It's a lousy disease, but I have some control over it," Rocco said.

In another new study on sugar, mice were fed a diet with 25 percent added sugar, a level currently considered safe in humans. Researchers found that female mice died at twice the normal rate and male mice were less likely to reproduce.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

DIABETES: With type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the rise, it is clear that Americans need to be more cautious about their daily sugar intake. Diabetes is usually classified as a disease that may potentially be treated with the right diet and exercise, but it can also lead to further diseases and health issues if not taken care of. Diabetes occurs when the blood sugar in a body is too high. With this being said, it is no wonder why 8.3% of the American population is battling this prevalent disease. (Source: www.diabetes.org and www.mayoClinic.com)

TYPE 1 DIABETES: Type 1 is typically found in young adults and children and occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. This can be monitored and treated through insulin injections as well diet and exercise. (www.diabetes.org)

TYPE 2 DIABETES: The most common form of diabetes, type 2, occurs when the pancreas produces too much insulin then begins to not produce the proper amount that the body needs. To control blood glucose levels, it is essential that the blood sugar is frequently checked by a finger prick and a daily log of results. (www.diabetes.org)

SYMPTOMS: Most of the symptoms below can alert a person of early development diabetes; however, some symptoms are so mild they may go unnoticed. (www.diabetes.org)

  • Feeling hungry and thirsty often
  • Often urination
  • Weight loss
  • Blurred vision
  • Fatigue
  • Wounds that take time to heal
  • Numbness, pain or tingling sensation in hands or feet (type2) 

PREVENTION: A healthy and active lifestyle is a fundamental element in diabetes prevention. A nutritious and balanced diet full of vegetables and fruits as well as a physically active lifestyle is the key ingredient to a lively body. (www.diabetes.org)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Richard Jacoby, DPM
Medical Director
Scottsdale Neuropathy Institute
480-994-5977

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