Get ‘HIP' to Medical Identification - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Get ‘HIP' to Medical Identification

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PROVIDENCE, R.I. (Ivanhoe Newswire) - Seconds can save lives during a medical emergency and now there is a new "hip" way to quickly retrieve a person's information using NFC technology.

Samsung Galaxy made it easy to bump and share information and that same technology called near field communication, or NFC, could also help save a life.

In 2003, doctors diagnosed Angelo Pitassi III with diabetes.

"It's like taking your child home as a newborn for the first time," Angelo A. Pitassi Jr., CEO/Co-founder, HealthID Profile, Inc., told Ivanhoe.

That feeling inspired Angelo Pitassi Jr.to create HealthID Profile, or HIP, an online mobile health management system.

"We use a cloud based storage solution," Angelo said.

Users receive a HIP code located on each HealthID product that they use to register. From there, they input all of their medical information including MRI's, EKG's, and X-rays.

Their unique HIP code is also printed right on their HealthID band or card.

With a simple tap, diabetic Michael Securo can instantly call up his medical information.

"I know if I go down, something happens, my sugar bottoms out, someone can get my information, have access to it immediately," Michael Securo told Ivanhoe.

The HIP cards and bands use NFC chips to quickly retrieve a patient's information and all come with a medical alert symbol to alert first responders.

"The phone actually energizes the chip. The chip goes out to the cloud based service and displays the information on the phone," Christopher Melo, CTO, HealthID Profile, Inc., told Ivanhoe.

If a first responder does not have an NFC device, they can simply go www.healthid.com  and enter a person's HIP code.

HealthID said they follow HIPAA guidelines and all of the medical information is securely stored. The NFC band costs 24 bucks and the card costs 20.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

NEAR FIELD COMMUNICATION: Near field communication, often referred to as NFC, is a way to communicate through smartphones and tablets. A cloud like server stores a person's information by NFC then transmits the information to the connected device. This is usually the method used for sharing photos and videos online and now it is being used for personal medical records and information through Samsung cell phones. This is a beneficial and easy method of locating a person's medical history. (Source: www.nearfieldcommunication.org)

HOW DOES HIP OPERATE?: By creating a HealthID profile (HIP) online, you can update your medical information, history, and records, such as X-rays, EKG's, MRI's etc. to a server. This server holds all personal information that is entered in the person's profile and it connects to a band, card, or cell phone. Once the account is created, a code is sent to the user and then the access is granted. A NFC chip is implanted in these devices, administering a user's information.  (Source: www.healthid.com)

WHAT IT IS USED FOR: This HIP band was created by Angelo Pitassi, Jr. in hopes that this would bring relief to people who battle with disease, sickness, or serious physical injury. This simple technology allows emergency respondents, doctors, and family members to see a person's medical information if emergency were to strike. It can be looked at as an electronic medical file for emergency personnel to access when needed. This is very convenient for the elderly and sick.  All they need to have on them is the band or emergency card, and they are safe if anything were to unexpectedly occur. (Source: www.healthid.com)  

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Angelo A. Pitassi, Jr.
CEO/Co-Founder
HealthID Profile, Inc.
angelo@healthid.com
(401) 519- 6566

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