Violent Crimes Rise At Tennessee Colleges - NewsChannel5.com | Nashville News, Weather & Sports

Violent Crimes Rise At Tennessee Colleges

NASHVILLE, Tenn.- The Virginia Tech massacre draws more attention to crime on college campuses.

On Friday, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation released new statistics.

The total number of crimes reported at Tennessee colleges and universities went down about one percent.  But violent crime was up including rapes and robberies.

The new crime numbers give Tennessee State University a lot to cheer about.

Unlike some of the other major schools in Tennessee, TSU experienced fewer robberies and sex offenses in 2006. It's tightened up a little bit.

"It's tightened up a lot, but there is still some stuff that still goes on," said student Lamar Ward.

Despite the success at TSU, violent crime rose 16 percent last year on Tennessee college campuses.

The number of robberies went up at each of these schools.

The University of Memphis had twice as many robberies over the previous year. Robberies also doubled at MTSU.

 Vanderbilt, the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga and the University of Tennessee in Knoxville also reported increases.

TSU reported just one robbery. Vanderbilt University and Tennessee Tech University reported the most sex offenses. But Vanderbilt's number is way down from the previous year.

Middle Tennessee State University is next along with UT-Knoxville followed by Austin Peay State University.

Police said rape has always been a crime that is underreported and students feel that's the case on college campuses.

"More definitely goes on than is reported," TSU student Ashley Bradshaw. "People don't report it."

MTSU, TSU and the University of Memphis are next.  UT-Knoxville follows, but the university cut the number in half from the previous year.

Vanderbilt also reported the most burglaries.

UT-Chattanooga was next followed by the University of Memphis, MTSU and TSU.

Many TSU students said even just a few crimes on campus are still too many.

They expect to be safe.

"Most of these kids here or adults what ever they want to call themselves, they're away from home, so they expect it to be safe automatically," Bradshaw said.

Powered by WorldNow
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 NewsChannel 5 (WTVF-TV) and WorldNow. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.