News

Actions

Person living in padlocked, 'dangerous' home says gunfire, criminal activity was common

Posted at 10:42 PM, Feb 20, 2020
and last updated 2020-02-20 23:45:04-05

HERMITAGE, Tenn. (WTVF) — A man who was living in a "dangerous" home that was padlocked by Metro Nashville Police said he knew there was criminal activity happening in the house.

On Thursday morning, MNPD officers raided the home at 365 Monaco Drive. Officers said the house had been a nuisance for years and had been searched by police numerous times. Neighbors said it was a hub for criminal activity, like drug deals, domestic violence and gunfire. There was even a homicide at the home in 2019. This was only the fourth time police have padlocked a Metro home, according to officers.

"Seized during today's raid: 4 grams of heroin, 10 pills, 20 grams of marijuana, 1 gram of meth, drug paraphernalia, digital scales, a live military smoke grenade, and 7 guns," Metro Police Department said via tweet Thursday evening. There were also 27 people inside the home, including an infant. Eleven of the people inside were wanted on active warrants.

NewsChannel 5 spoke with a man who was taken out of the home in handcuffs Thursday morning, but was back walking outside the house later that day. The man said he didn't know how many people were living in the house. When asked if he knew there were people who were wanted on warrants inside the house he responded yes, but that it was police's job to find them.

He also admitted that gunshots were common around the home, happening as recently as Wednesday night.

Police arrested several people after the raid, including the homeowner.

For neighbors, the padlocking was a moment of relief. They said the house had caused trouble in the area for years. In some cases, neighbors were afraid to spend time outside.

"There's actually a couple kids that are afraid to get on the bus by themselves or get off the bus by when they come home," Quentin McCrary said. "It's been a constant nuisance."

Police said in the last seven years there have been more than 100 9-1-1 calls to the house.

"I've called maybe 7 or 8 times," McCrary said. Now he's hoping the neighborhood can finally be calm.