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Metro Council member's resolution to institute mask mandate in Davidson County fails

COVID-19 mask generic
Posted at 8:15 AM, Aug 17, 2021
and last updated 2021-08-17 23:11:50-04

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — Metro Council Member Joy Styles filed a resolution, calling for another mask mandate in Davidson County to help slow COVID hospitalizations.

The resolution died without any discussion. It was filed just in time for Tuesday night’s Metro Council meeting, which meant it went before the rules committee. If two people on the council objected to it, it would die immediately.

Four council members objected to the resolution. If there had been no objections, it would have been discussed and voted on.

The resolution calls on Dr. Gill Wright at Metro Public Health to institute a mask mandate for indoor public spaces. Styles also proposed a bill that would essentially have the council implementing a mask mandate; however, that takes time. Bills take three votes to pass.

The proposed mandates would include all Davidson County residents – vaccinated or unvaccinated.

Councilwoman Styles told NewsChannel 5 that Metro needs to take every step possible to protect the health and safety of residents – pointing to the high transmission rates, hospital admissions being up and the fact that there are still so many people who are not yet vaccinated.

Until now, only Nashville Mayor John Cooper and the Health Department have issued mask mandates.


WHERE YOU WOULDN'T HAVE TO WEAR A MASK

There would be exceptions to this ordinance. A mask would not be required in the following settings or circumstances:

  • In your own home
  • Anyone younger than 2 years old
  • Anyone with a medical condition that prevents them from wearing a mask – medical documentation showing proof would be required
  • In your car
  • In a separate office or non-public work space where there’s adequate social distancing
  • When wearing a mask poses a “safety risk.” For example, working on a ladder, operating heavy machinery or wearing other respiratory equipment would qualify as a “safety risk.”
  • While eating or drinking in a restaurant or bar
  • Outdoor public spaces
  • During outdoor recreational work
  • While in a place of worship
  • While in an indoor space owned, managed or leased by the State of Tennessee