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Boxer's $50,000 Gift Sparks New Legal Battle

Posted: 8:14 PM, May 14, 2015
Updated: 2015-09-11 12:20:28-04
Boxer's $50,000 Gift Sparks New Legal Battle
Boxer's $50,000 Gift Sparks New Legal Battle

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- A $50,000 gift from champion prize fighter Floyd Mayweather is prompting the state to level new contempt allegations against the subject of a long running NewsChannel 5 investigation.

It turns out that Mayweather and Don Hale, the co-founder of HRC Medical, have known each other for years. Recently, that long-standing relationship paid off big time for Hale.

Before Don Hale and his brother Dan started the Nashville-based chain of hormone replacement clinics across the country, Hale was a boxing promoter who helped raise Mayweather when the boxer was in his teens.

More recently, the Hales have been tied up in a two-year court fight with the state of Tennessee. 

After our investigation raised questions about patient safety and possible overdoses at HRC, state regulators shut down the company and a judge froze the Hales' assets. 

The state attorney general's office has now asked the judge to hold the Hales in contempt for failing to disclose monthly expenses and income, including tens of thousands of dollars that Hale received from Mayweather.

Prosecutors first learned about the financial gift right before Mayweather's fight earlier this month against Manny Pacquiao when Mayweather was asked by reporters about his longtime friend.

The boxer said then, "He's kind of going through a lot right now. Don's kind of going through a lot right now. He's been good to me. This dude, he was giving me, he was taking care of me. So, you know, he's going through, he getting sued right now. So, I be, I be, I sent him $50,000. I sent him money to make sure him and his family are OK."

In court papers filed this week, Don Hale's wife, Dixie, confirmed that Mayweather was the source of the cash the couple used to pay $18,000 in bills, including utilities, landscaping and swimming pool expenses. 

But the state said that was not enough information and demanded a full accounting.

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