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'We ain't playing f***ing nice!' New video shows 'zip-tie guy,' mom during Capitol riot

Eric Munchel Video Screenshot.png
Posted at 11:17 AM, Oct 13, 2021

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — Newly released video shows how Capitol riot suspect Eric Munchel, the so-called "zip-tie guy," and his mother methodically worked their way through protesters, ultimately ending up in the U.S. Senate gallery during the January 6th insurrection.

The federal judge overseeing the case against Munchel and his mother, Lisa Marie Eisenhart, ordered release of the 50-minute video that was recorded on a cell phone that the son wore on his vest during the riot. Munchel is from Nashville, while Eisenhart is from Woodstock, Ga.

Watch video highlights below (language warning)

New video shows 'zip-tie guy,' mom during Capitol riot

During their 38-minute effort to get inside the U.S. Capitol where Congress was attempting to certify Joe Biden's election as president, Munchel and Eisenhart can be heard on the video celebrating that the riot was making national news.

"This s**t is on the news," Eisenhart tells her son. "Somebody was saying this is on the news."

Munchel replies, "Oh, yeah, definitely."

'They are going to use this against us as hard as they can," the son continues. "But we ain't playing f***ing nice no godd**n more."

Eisenhart agrees, "That's right."

As they make their way through the crowd, one person suggests: "You guys look like y'all ready to go, huh?"

Munchel answers, "F***ing ready to f*** sh*t up!"

A female protester asks the mother and son if they are members of the far-right Proud Boys.

"No, we're not Proud Boys," Eisenhart insists.

Munchel adds, "We're proud Americans."

The video does not reveal extensive conversations between. the pair regarding their motivations, although they are clearly driven by the lie pushed by President Donald Trump that the election was stolen.

Inside the Capitol, Eisenhart joins in shouts of "treason, treason, treason." At another point, she yells, "We want a fair election."

As Munchel and Eisenhart push their way through the crowd outside the Capitol, one man announces that "Congress is shut down."

"Tear gas package was thrown in the Congress," the man continues, as people cheer. "Congress is shut down."

Eisenhart laughs.

"Oh, my God. That is one of my best days to know that they got tear-gassed."

The pair also encounter another protester moving away from the Capitol.

"Did you get flash-banged and pepper-sprayed?" Eisenhart asks.

"I got maced," the man responds. "I punched two of them in the face."

Eisenhart's response: "Good."

"While everyone else was on the couch, you guys were training and getting ready," she continues.

"Asbolutely," the man acknowledges.

As mother and son finally get ready to enter the U.S. Capitol, Munchel acknowledges he's engaged in conduct that could get him in trouble.

"Probably the last time I'll be able to enter the building with armor and f***ing weapons," he says.

Munchel shouts, "I guess they thought we were playing!"

Inside the Capitol, the son defers to his mother about what's next.

"What's your goal here, Mom?"

Along the way, Munchel encourages other rioters not to vandalize the Capitol.

"We aren't Antifa," he shouts.

The pair encounter other rioters who have found a stash of plastic handcuffs, commonly known as zip ties.

"I'm going to get me some of them motherf***ers," Munchel says, as they both grab handfuls of the restraint devices.

Munchel and Eisenhart appear to have little idea of their way around the Capitol, ending up by happenstance inside the U.S. Senate gallery.

"I want that f***ing gavel," Munchel shouts at one point.

After passing through the gallery, the pair quickly begin looking for an exit, with little comment on their way out.

Both Munchel and Eisenhart are awaiting trial on federal charges.