Spring Hill Teen Dies In Mowing Accident

SPRING HILL, Tenn. - A  Williamson County teen was tragically killed during a lawn mowing accident. 

Jacob Combs will be remembered as a "good kid" who was full of love for family, faith, and friends. 

According to a gofundme account created for the family, Jacob William Combs died in the mowing incident Thurs., July 19.

Jacob is one of six siblings under the care of his single mom Traci Combs. His youth pastor, David Green, said Combs was active in the youth group at Grace Chapel Church.

"He loved people. He loved Jesus. Which is why we believe he's alive right now in Heaven," Green said.

Those who knew him are remembering the impact he had on so many lives.

"Jacob loved and still loves his family, very protective, very close," Green said. "They described him as the person who could just figure anything out. You gave him a project, he would figure it out." 

As news of his death trickled through the community, grief took over.

"Definitely tears which is totally fine - a little bit of disbelief at first," he said.

Green said Jacob's church family is leaning on their faith to get them through this time.

"We're instructed to mourn with hope."

Jacob is the second Independence High School student to die in recent months. Students are taking it hard.

"What I saw on Sunday when we were in this room talking about what had happened with our church family; I saw a bunch of kids lean in to community and love each other and support each other," Green explained.

He leaves behind his mom and 6 siblings.

Green said, "The hope that they have in the midst of mourning because of what they know and believe to be true about Jacob, it's convicting to say the least." 

Jacob will be remembered for his willingness to help others; a quality that inspired everyone who knew him.

A memorial service will be held for Jacob Combs on July 25. Visitation is at noon at Williamson Memorial Gardens. The service will start directly after at 2 p.m. Pastors at Grace Chapel Church are available to talk to students who are having a tough time.

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