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COVID-19: 1,617 cases, 7 deaths confirmed in Tennessee

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Posted at 2:06 PM, Mar 28, 2020
and last updated 2020-03-29 11:58:55-04
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) —
  • The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Tennessee has risen to 1,617. Seven deaths have been reported across the state, including two in Davidson County.

NewsChannel 5 is keeping an independent count of cases in the state, using information from both the Tennessee Department of Health and local health agencies.

Davidson County continues to have the highest number of cases in the state at 394. Metro health officials confirmed the county's second death on Friday. Sumner Regional Medical Center confirmed Saturday morning that one of their elderly patients from a Gallatin nursing home had died, bringing the state's death toll to seven.

Shelby County has the second highest number of cases at 362.

The Tennessee Department of Health said there have been 118 hospitalizations.

Below is a breakdown of the cases, using numbers from both TDH and local health departments:

  • Anderson County - 5
  • Bedford County – 1
  • Benton County - 3
  • Blount County - 9
  • Bradley County - 5
  • Campbell County – 4
  • Cannon County - 3
  • Carroll County - 4
  • Carter - 1
  • Cheatham County - 7
  • Chester County - 2
  • Claiborne County - 2
  • Cocke County - 1
  • Cumberland County - 6
  • Davidson County - 394
  • Decatur -1
  • DeKalb County - 3
  • Dickson County - 11
  • Dyer County - 3
  • Fayette County - 4
  • Franklin County - 3
  • Gibson County - 2
  • Greene County - 8
  • Grundy County - 2
  • Hamblen County - 2
  • Hamilton County - 35
  • Hardeman - 1
  • Hardin County - 1
  • Hawkins County - 2
  • Houston County - 2
  • Jefferson County - 5
  • Knox County - 33
  • Lewis County - 2
  • Lincoln County - 1
  • Loudon County – 6
  • Macon County - 2
  • Madison County - 3
  • Marion County - 4
  • Maury County - 8
  • McMinn County – 3
  • Meigs County - 1
  • Monroe County - 3
  • Montgomery County - 11
  • Overton County - 2
  • Perry County - 2
  • Putnam County - 17
  • Roane County - 1
  • Robertson County -23
  • Rutherford County - 46
  • Scott County - 2
  • Sevier County - 6
  • Shelby County – 362
  • Smith County - 1
  • Sullivan County - 6
  • Sumner County - 82
  • Tipton County – 11
  • Trousdale - 1
  • Unicoi County - 1
  • Union - 1
  • Washington County - 14
  • Weakley - 1
  • White County - 1
  • Williamson County - 95
  • Wilson County - 20
  • Resident of another state/country: 148
  • Pending: 161
Age Ranges of Confirmed Cases
0-1016
11-2071
21-30346
31-40221
41-50224
51-60218
61-70153
71-8087
80+28
Pending9
Total1,373

According to the state department of health, the labs notify local jurisdictions first, which leads to some local health departments reporting higher numbers. They took to social media explaining the discrepancy saying, "Laboratory reports of positive cases are reported to metro and local health departments as soon as results are available. State numbers are updated at 2 p."

Metro and Tennessee health officials have warned the growing demand for testing is leading to a longer turnaround for results, which might create a false impression that the curve is beginning to flatten in the state.

Governor Bill Lee has asked all public schools to remain closed until April 24.

MORE TENNESSEE COVID-19 COVERAGE

See all our coronavirus coverage here

COUNTY-BY-COUNTY CASES IN TENNESSEE

What is COVID-19 (a.k.a. the new coronavirus?)

According to the World Health Organization, coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. Examples include the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans. COVID-19 stands for "Coronavirus disease 2019," which is when this strain of the coronavirus was discovered.

What are the symptoms?

The CDC says patients confirmed to have the 2019-nCoV reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness with:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Or at least two of the following symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

At this time, the CDC believes symptoms could appear as soon as two days after exposure, or as long as 14 days.

Prevention

The CDC is recommending "common sense" measures such as:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.