News

Actions

Kroger limits hours; adds first hour for elderly, at risk only

Posted: 8:22 PM, Mar 20, 2020
Updated: 2020-03-20 21:22:26-04
Kroger to lay off hundreds of workers

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — Local Kroger stores are changing hours of operation amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

One of the changes includes a first hour of operation shopping for seniors and other higher-risk customers four days a week.

Kroger will be open daily from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. On Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, high-risk customers can shop from 7 to 8 a.m.

"We know from the CDC that seniors and others with seriously underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness," said Melissa Eads, corporate affairs manager for the Kroger Nashville division. "Many of our shoppers have shared with us their concerns for this most vulnerable group, so we believe they will respect this decision and hold off their shopping during these times."

The changes begin on Monday, March 23. Kroger said it will be limiting hours to balance the needs of employees and allow more time for cleaning and restocking.

All Kroger grocery stores in the Nashville division will make the change. This includes Middle and East Tennessee, North Alabama and Southern Kentucky.

MORE TENNESSEE COVID-19 COVERAGE

See all our Coronavirus coverage here

COUNTY-BY-COUNTY CASES IN TENNESSEE

What is COVID-19 (a.k.a. the new coronavirus?)

According to the World Health Organization, coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. Examples include the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans. COVID-19 stands for "Coronavirus disease 2019," which is when this strain of the coronavirus was discovered.

What are the symptoms?

The CDC says patients confirmed to have the 2019-nCoV reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness with:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • At this time, the CDC believes symptoms could appear as soon as two days after exposure, or as long as 14 days.

Prevention

The CDC is recommending "common sense" measures such as:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.