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April 16 COVID-19 update: 6,262 cases, 141 deaths in Tennessee

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Posted at 9:11 AM, Apr 16, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-17 08:55:28-04

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF)  — The Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed 6,262 cases of COVID-19 across the state. The department said 141 deaths have been reported.

TDOH officials said of those cases, 2,786 have recovered, while 691 have been hospitalized.

Earlier in the day, Metro Public Health Department officials confirmed 1,560 cases of COVID-19 in Nashville/Davidson County, an increase of 68 in the past 24 hours. An additional death was also confirmed.

Watch the full briefing below:

Dr. Alex Jahangir said the confirmed cases range in age from 2 months to 94 years. The county's 18th death was also confirmed after a 70-year-old man died. Jahangir said he had underlying health conditions.

Seventy residents have been hospitalized in Davidson County facilities. Of the confirmed cases, 677 individuals have recovered from the virus. Metro health officials said the large number of newly recovered cases is a result of updated data reporting procedures.

The remaining cases are self-isolating at home with mild and manageable symptoms. The MPHD COVID-19 Hotline received 257 calls on Wednesday, April 15, 2020.


Total number of cases: 1,560
Cases reported in the past 24 hours: 68

Cases by sex
Male: 725
Female: 730
Unknown: 105

Total cases by age

Unknown
44
0-10
22
11-20
77
21-30
487
31-40
292
41-50
213
51-60
199
61-70
135
71-80
70
81+
21
Total
1,560
Recovered
677
Deaths
18
Total active cases
865

Nashville Mayor John Cooper urged everyone to continue following the "Safer at Home" order and to wear face coverings.

Metro Nashville Public Schools Director Dr. Adrienne Battle also said the district will be implementing a strategic framework for students while schools remain closed for the rest of the year.

Starting this week and next, MNPS will work to make sure every student has access to a "high-quality education that will prepare them for the next school year." This will include support for teachers and staff on best practices while working remotely with their students.

Beginning April 27, Metro Schools said students can expect a "more structured learning environment" that won't include required graded materials or attendance that count towards a student’s record. However, they said it will involve more accountability and tracking of student outcomes in the interest of developing their success.

On Wednesday, the Tennessee Department of Health confirmed 6,079 cases and 135 deaths across the state. TDOH said 2,196 people have since recovered from the virus.

Tennessee is also expanding its testing capacity for COVID-19, including making free tests available statewide. Gov. Bill Lee said the tests will be available for any Tennessean at no cost, regardless of traditional symptoms.

Additionally, all rural county health departments will offer free testing five days a week. Click here for a full list of sites.

MORE TENNESSEE COVID-19 COVERAGE

See all our coronavirus coverage here

COUNTY-BY-COUNTY CASES IN TENNESSEE

What is COVID-19 (a.k.a. the new coronavirus?)

According to the World Health Organization, coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. Examples include the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans. COVID-19 stands for "Coronavirus disease 2019," which is when this strain of the coronavirus was discovered.

What are the symptoms?

The CDC says patients confirmed to have the 2019-nCoV reportedly had mild to severe respiratory illness with:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Or at least two of the following symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

At this time, the CDC believes symptoms could appear as soon as two days after exposure, or as long as 14 days.

Prevention

The CDC is recommending "common sense" measures such as:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.