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Davidson County racetrack frustrated with county’s strict guidelines

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Posted at 5:28 PM, May 12, 2020
and last updated 2020-05-12 19:49:13-04

GOODLETTSVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — As some businesses in Davidson County begin to reopen, one Goodlettsville racetrack is impatiently waiting to do so.

The Music City Raceway falls under phase four of the county's reopening plan. Owner Rick Gonzalez said he is frustrated with the county’s stricter guidelines.

Gonzalez said they haven't opened in nine weeks. The pandemic has been hard on the business, adding salt to the wound is the uncertainty of when he can reopen.

"This is the first time we haven't had races on Tuesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays," said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez said Davidson County has stricter guidelines than his neighboring counties and if he were in Robertson or Sumner county he’d already be back in business.

It’s the strict guidelines that’s also holding him back from getting his motorsport insurance.

"If there's a wreck we aren't taking the liability but insurance companies won't give us insurance until the city says OK," said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez said they have come up with a plan so they could socially distance safely. Being an outdoor sport, they could spread out the spectators.

Taking it a step further, Gonzalez said they’d be willing to not allow spectators at all temporarily if that means they can open the gates. He said they just want to get the green light from the county to get up and running.

We did reach out to Mayor John Cooper’s office about this request. Their office sent NewsChannel 5 this statement:

"Our office has been in touch with the owners of Music City Racetrack and many other local business owners who have contacted our office over the past several weeks. We sympathize with both employers and workers in Davidson County who are facing financial difficulties during this time of historic challenge. We welcome residents’ feedback as we continue our phased economic reopening. But protecting public health is our number one priority as we get Nashvillians back to work while maintain our global reputation for safety."

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