Fatal Shooting Added To Short List of Metro Officer-Involved Shootings

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - A 25-year-old man was killed at the hands of a Metro Nashville Police officer, adding it to a short list of shootings in Nashville in which officers have been involved.

Agents with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation are still in the early stages of their investigation of Thursday night's shooting.

So far, they've determined that Metro Officer Andrew Delke shot and killed 25-year-old Daniel Hambrick during a chase over what was thought to be a stolen vehicle. Hambrick died at the hospital.

TBI Confirms Video In Officer-Involved Shooting

The incident comes more than a year after a Robertson County Sheriff's Deputy was injured in an attack by an inmate.

Federal prisoner Rodney L. Cole attacked Deputy Joshua Wiley with a screwdriver while at a clinic in 100 Oaks in Nashville. Deputy Wiley shot and killed during the incident.

Investigation Complete In Officer-Involved Shooting

Metro Nashville Police led the investigation in which no charges were filed and Deputy Wiley was expected to make a full recovery.

Four months prior, Metro Nashville Police Officer Joshua Lippert shot and killed Jocques Clemmons.

Police said Lippert stopped Clemmons over running a stop sign near James Cayce Homes. Surveillance cameras in the area captured the two getting in a scuffle that ultimately led to Lippert shooting and killing Clemmons.

Effects Of Jocques Clemmons Shooting Still Linger

The case divided the community and prompted several protests from Black Lives Matter activists and eventually led to the formation of the "Justice for Jocques Coalition."

It also caused a serious rift between local and state agencies eventually prompting a "memorandum of understanding" that the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation would investigate all fatal officer-involved shootings in Nashville.

No charges were filed against Officer Lippert, but a report by the District Attorney criticized the Metro Police Department's procedures that could lead to potential bias.

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