NewsOn The Rise

Actions

Music City Studios: What major media campus means for Hendersonville

Music City Studios mega-site proposal
Posted at 5:17 PM, Oct 28, 2021

HENDERSONVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — A new media campus could bring 800 jobs to the Mid-State.

David Buttrey with Music City Studios said the 47-acre creative campus would make Nashville a one stop shop.

"What’s amazing is Nashville has turned from this kind of sleepy tier two city to a white-hot tier two city, and the entertainment industry is waking up," Buttrey said.

More music videos, TV shows, and broadcasts could be created at the site. "Rough estimate is it could be a 50/50 split from companies coming out of state to hiring locally," Buttrey said.

The anchor tenant and partner in Music City Studios is Monolith Studios, a full-service virtual production and content creation studio, specializing in proprietary LED volume architecture and content-to-display systems and services.

David Bennett, who will serve as vice president of business development for Monolith Studios, said the company is looking forward to the LED technology. "You can create many types of environments in a virtual product workspace, you can be on the streets of Paris or the streets of London, you can be on the surface of the moon."

This will be Monolith's first office in Tennessee.

The Hendersonville Mayor Jamie Clary said it would generate around 800 jobs and $500,000 in tax revenue. "What $500,000 per year means for Hendersonville is we have the opportunity to pave a lot more roads," Clary said.

As far as traffic concerns, he said there's an interchange expansion project in the works.

"The new interchange, gosh, it’s going to be one right turn from this place,” Clary said. “To help eliminate any concerns about future traffic. This is just a perfect location for Hendersonville not only because of our background in music with Johnny Cash and Taylor Swift and Conway Twitty, but it’s also the perfect location."

Due to building height, city officials will have to vote on it. Since the zoning will have to be changed, there’s a meeting Tuesday with the planning commission at 6 p.m.

After that, they'll be one step closer to breaking ground. "We’ve got a great talent base,” Bennett said. “So I think you’re seeing brighter days ahead for production in Tennessee."

Bennett said Nashville has a deep-rooted history in film. The first one was shot at the Ryman Auditorium in 1936.